Wholesale European Nightcrawlers Eisenia Hortensis in North Georgia

Wholesale European Nightcrawlers, Eisenia Hortensis in Dawsonville Ga. 30534

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How to Raise and care for the European nightcrawler

Posted by Herron Farms on May 1, 2011 at 1:14 AM

Keeping and Caring for European Nightcrawlers

European nightcrawlers are easy to keep and raise. The most common bedding for

european nightcrawlers is peat moss. You can mix this with shredded news paper.

European nightcrawlers do not have to be keep in refrigerator. They like it at

room temperature.

Chicken laying mash is a good feed for european nightcrawlers. Purina makes

commercial worm feed that works well.

If you are looking for a dual purpose worm for both fishing and composting the

european nightcrawlers is the worm you want. European nightcrawlers will eat and

compost the same as red worms do but since european nightcrawlers are much

larger than red worms that make the perfect fishing worm.

Fishing with European Nightcrawlers

European nightcrawlers are becoming one of the most popular fishing worms.

They are much larger than red worms and very active. The european nightcrawlers

has a tough skin that helps in keeping them on your hook. I have been told many

times by my customers that they have caught more than one fish with the same

worm. The European nightcrawlers we sell for bait are 3 to 4 inches long and as

big around as a #2 pencil.

European Nightcrawlers, also know as Giant Redworms and Belgium Worms, were

introduced into the United States from Europe in the late 1990's. Since that time,

this worm is becoming more and more popular as both a large composting

earthworm and an all around fishing bait here in the states. European

Nightcrawlers grow three to eight inches long and thick as a pencil.

Although Red Wigglers or Redworms are the better known composting

earthworms, European Nightcrawlers make great composting worms for those who

wish to grow a larger earthworm. Much bigger than their smaller cousin the Red

Wiggler or Redworm, European Nightcrawlers are easily grown in the same

manner as Red Wigglers. Besides their size, the main difference between Red

Wigglers and European Nightcrawlers for composting is that European

Nightcrawlers do not breed as quickly nor eat as much as Red Wigglers. Kept

reasonably warm and well fed, adult European Nightcrawlers will produce about

one egg capsules per earthworm a week. It takes from three to seven months

from hatching to maturity. The happier and less crowded they are, the faster they

will reach maturity.

If you are a fisherman looking for the perfect bait worm, look no further. The

European Nightcrawler makes a superb bait worm, fantastic for all types of fish.

Kept at temperatures between 40 degrees to 90 degrees Fahrenheit, European

Nightcrawlers will live from three to five weeks in a bait cup. Much more heat

tolerant than the common northern nightcrawler, they are also more cold tolerant

than many other types of earthworms. European Nightcrawlers prefer conditions

higher in moisture than most types of earthworms. Their affinity for moisture plus

their cold tolerance, make them very attractive for ice fishing. European

Nightcrawlers will still be active on the hook long after other baits have died.

These worms are tough. The only earthworm suitable for bait in brackish salt

water, European Nightcrawlers will stay active on the hook even after thirty

minutes in freezing or salty water. Will out fish common northern nightcrawlers,

European Nightcrawlers are wonderful fishing worms. If you fish and haven't tried

European Nightcrawlers, you just don't know what you are missing!

The European Nightcrawlers we ship are between 1.2 to 1.5 grams each.

Please do not expect worms that look like Canadian Nightcrawlers.

European Nightcrawlers will not grow as big as the Canadian Nightcrawlers.

Facts about European Nightcrawlers

Since its alot of different information about european nightcrawlers we will give

you some facts that we have experience here at our farm raising european

nightcrawlers.

It takes 4 weeks give or take a few days for a european nightcrawler egg to hatch.

It's only 1 european nightcrawler baby worm per egg (95% of the time). It's rare but

we have found 2 european nightcrawler baby worm per egg. Try it yourself. Find a

european nightcrawler egg in your beds that is a dark brown. This color indicates

the egg is about to hatch. Find the round end and slightly mash the egg and push

the baby european nightcrawler out the pointed end. This should easily be done. It

will not harm the baby worm. Notice the size of the baby european nightcrawler its

much larger than red worms are at time of hatching.

It takes 12 to 16 weeks for a european nightcrawler to become mature enough to

breed. This is indicated by development of the breeding band near it's head. The

young european nightcrawler breeder's eggs will not be as large as a mature

breeder and the hatching percentage will be lower. If conditions are good

european nightcrawlers will lay one egg per week.

Mealworms

We have live mealworms for feeding your

bluebirds and pets. We guarantee live

delivery.

Live Mealworms

European Nightcrawlers

Live Mealworms

 

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2 Comments

Reply susan
8:01 AM on June 1, 2012 
Enquiry, t he best bedding material for euros and what would be the best feed to use rather than horse manure as I have had a problem not realising I was introducing more reds and field worms into the euros beds, as reds tend to breed faster than euros taking over.
I really want to only breed euros for retail bait shops. I breed the euros in crates off the ground.
Can you help with my question?
Reply Larry Wayne
9:50 PM on March 9, 2014 
A friend gave me 500 euros to start composting, and to have some for bait. I bedded them down with shredded leaves after adding a little hydrated limestone, some fine dirt, and sand. I was not sure about feeding them horse manure, so I added 1/2" on only half the bed; and they seem to like that. I wonder what will happen with introducing reds & field worms; and what impact they will have on the euro colony.